Contents

Articles can be downloaded here at Jstor.

 

Introduction: Humour and Anthropology
Michiel Swinkels and Anouk de Koning
7
‘Down With Some Things!’
The Politics of Humour and Humour as Politics in Turkey’s Cezi Protests
Mahiye Seçil Daǧtaş
11
‘Pushing the Edge’ of Race and Gender Hegemonies through Stand-up Comedy
Performing Slavery as Anti-racist Critique
Katja Antoine
35
Uncomfortable Laughter
Reflections on Violence, Humour and Immorality in Argentina
Eva van Roekel
55
Humour and Humility
Narratives of Modernity on Nukulaelae Atoll
Niko Besnier
75
Humour and Lying
Male Sociality among Coastal Sinhalese
Maurice Said
97
Humour in the Negotiations of Social Identity in the Tongan Diaspora
Elisabeth Betz and Toon van Meijl   
111
Scatological Children’s Humour
Notes from the Netherlands and Anywhere
Sjaak van der Geest
127
Afterword: Humour Matters
Henk Driessen
141
IN CONVERSATION: SECURITY
Some Thoughts on the Critical Anthropology of Security
Daniel M. Goldstein
147

Errata Etnofoor Humour

There are several mistakes in two articles in our previous Humour issue we would like to rectify.

***

In the article of Katja Antoine we published a wrong e-mail address and affiliation. She does not work at the University of California, Los Angeles as the article lists. Instead, she is owner of Inclusive Logic Consulting, LLC. Her e-mail address is not kat.ant@ucla.edu, but info@inclusivelogic.com.

Moreover, two words were printed incorrectly:

On page 35 the text reads, “We see its expressions in a variety of historically familiar ways, such as overt racism on school campuses with hostile campus publications, and graphic displays of blackface and noses.” The last word should be “nooses”.

On page 36 the text reads, “By looking at the ‘edges’ of hegemony and how they are pushed, we can deepen our understanding of how racism – white supremacy and sexism – operate in the U.S. in the contemporary (non)-postracial moment…”. This should be “…we can deepen our understanding of how racism-white supremacy and sexism operate…”.

Antoine links racism and white supremacy to emphasize that she sees them as two sides of the same coin (which the end note to that sentence explains). The formulation as was originally published, however, suggests that she defines racism as white supremacy and sexism. This is not the argument she makes in this article and the end note that explains her use of the linked term in effect appears to reference something that isn’t there.

***

In the article of Said a quote was wrongly published (p. 101) as:

“Furthermore, she states that:

The tone of obvious pretence (boru) within the different contexts I discuss evokes two types of relationships: on the one hand a relationship of domination, aggression, and superiority; on the other hand a relationship of accommodation, conflict avoidance, and courtship and she emphasises that she understands the most common use of boruva at the local level as a general form of conflict avoidance (ibid.: 322).”

This should be:

“Furthermore, she states (ibid.: 322) that:

<quote>The tone of obvious pretence (boru) within the different contexts I discuss evokes two types of relationships: on the one hand a relationship of domination, aggression, and superiority; on the other hand a relationship of accommodation, conflict avoidance, and courtship.<quote>

She emphasises that she understands ‘the most common use of boruva at the local level as a general form of conflict avoidance’ (ibid.).”

 

 

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